Why are there wet spots on my candles?

A. The wet spots that you see are not really wet spots at all. They are caused by shrinkage and air bubbles that occur as the wax is cooling inside the container. It is more common with paraffin wax but can also occur with soy. Some of the wax pulls away from the glassware and some sticks to the container giving it this particular look.

This is common even in expensive candle lines. It in no way affects the burnability of the candle. But if you would like to minimize this problem, here are some tips to help:

  • Wash your glass with mild, soapy water and dry thoroughly before using.

  • Make sure the room where the wax is cooling is not too cold. 70-72 degrees F is best.

  • Pre-heat your glassware in a warm oven prior to pouring (100- 110 degrees F), this will allow the wax to cool more slowly and give air bubbles time to escape to the surface.

  • Raising or lowering the pour temperature of the wax can affect glass adhesion.

  • Pour the wax slowly into the container.

  • Tap the glassware gently right after you've poured the wax to release any air bubbles.

  • Glass with a uniform thickness will cool more evenly. Jars with thick and thin spots will cool at different rates and can cause the wax to pull away. Pouring the wax at a cooler temperature in pre-heated glass can help reduce that.

  • While cooling your candles place them about 4" apart. Glass containers placed right next to each other will hold heat on the adjacent sides. This causes those sides to cool more slowly than the
    rest of the jar. Try to cool the entire candle at the same rate.

  • Set the candles on a wire rack rather than on a counter or table top that will pull the heat from the bottom of the jar. That can cause the wax to cool too fast so it shrinks and pulls away from the glass.

  • Try using a softer wax like a paraffin wax blend.
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